Naturalists in the making: 2016 OFNC award winners at the Ottawa Regional Science Fair

by Lucy Patterson

ScienceFair
What is the most endangered bird species in the world? What is the best way to contain an oil spill? Will the emerald ash borer begin attacking lilacs once ash trees have died out? These questions and many more were tackled by students on April 8 and 9 this year at the annual Ottawa Regional Science Fair. Since 1961, this volunteer-run event has encouraged students from grades 7 to 12 in the Ottawa-Carleton region to design, develop, and present research projects in science and engineering. The students with the best projects are then invited to participate in a Canada-Wide Science Fair. This year, the Ottawa Regional Science Fair was held at Carleton University’s “Raven’s Nest.”

Every year, the OFNC presents awards to the creators of two or three outstanding projects that “demonstrate a knowledge of some aspect of natural history, field ecology, or wildlife conservation.” This year, I judged the projects with Kathy Conlan, a research scientist and the section head of zoology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Students self-nominate themselves for the award, and this year there were 17 entries. In a world where interest in nature seems to be losing ground to technology, it was wonderful to see so many entries for this award!

Winners of OFNC awards this year were Dexter McIlroy, for his project demonstrating the effects of acid on mollusc shells (“L’acidification des océans’’ or “Ocean Acidification’’); Daniel Anderson, for his invention to prevent wildlife from being struck by tractors during haying season (“La chair de poule” or “Goosebumps”), and Maizie Solomon and Tara Hanson-Wright, for their project demonstrating the role of earthworms in soil decomposition (“Nature’s Gold Mine”). Each project was awarded a $100 prize. Congratulations to Dexter, Daniel, Maizie, and Tara for their exceptional projects!

Dexter McIlroy  with his project, “Ocean Acidification.”

Dexter McIlroy with his project, “Ocean Acidification.”

Daniel Anderson with his project, “Goosebumps.”

Daniel Anderson with his project, “Goosebumps.”

Maizie Soloman (left) and Tara Hanson-Wright in front of their project, “Nature’s Gold Mine.”

Maizie Soloman (left) and Tara Hanson-Wright in front of their project, “Nature’s Gold Mine.”

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